Kakapo country
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Kakapo country the story of the world"s most unusual bird by David Cemmick

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Published by Hodder and Stoughton in Auckland .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New Zealand.

Subjects:

  • Kakapo.,
  • Birds -- Conservation -- New Zealand.,
  • Natural history -- New Zealand.,
  • Natural history illustration -- New Zealand.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDavid Cemmick & Dick Veitch ; [foreword by David Bellamy].
ContributionsVeitch, Dick.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL696.P7 C45 1987
The Physical Object
Pagination127 p. :
Number of Pages127
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2236889M
ISBN 100340416475
LC Control Number89106857

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Get this from a library! Kakapo country: the story of the world's most unusual bird. [David Cemmick; C R Veitch] -- "Kakapo Country focuses on the plight of this ancient species - how it came to be critically endangered, where it nmow survives, and how it may be saved from extinction. It is a story which tells of. Kakapo Rescue: Saving the World’s Strangest Parrot, label the map below and identify animal importati on. Use a different colored pencil or marker for each animal to identify how an imals are imported from one country to another. The line should start in the animal’s native country and point to the country to which it has been Size: 1MB.   Aha! A kakapo! Once millions of these rather affable birds waddled all over New Zealand. Reduced (at present) to fewer t the kakapo have been isolated on Codfish Island (free of feral cats, weasels, and stoats—all introduced species) and are now under the strict, careful guardianship of the New Zealand National Kakapo Recovery Team/5(7). An ancient, flightless, nocturnal, herbivorous giant parrot, the kakapo was once numerous throughout the country but is now extinct in its natural range. At its low point, the population was reduced to as few as 40 known individuals, but thanks to the hard work and innovation of the Kakapo Recovery Programme, New Zealand's flagship threatened.

Kakapo breed in summer and autumn, but only in years of good fruit abundance. On islands in southern New Zealand they breed when the rimu trees fruit, which is once every 2 to 4 years. Elsewhere in New Zealand they probably nested when southern beech seeded, but the triggers for breeding in some northern places, including Hauturu, are unknown. Buy Kakapo Country. The Story of the World's Most Unusual Bird by David Cemmick, Dick Veitch, David Bellamy (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : David Cemmick, Dick Veitch. “[The kakapo] is an extremely fat bird. A good-sized adult will weigh about six or seven pounds, and its wings are just about good for waggling a bit if it thinks it's about to trip over something — but flying is out of the question. The event demonstrated that kakapo are sufficiently adaptable to survive and breed in an alien environment—a small, heavily modified island—and was thus a turning point in kakapo recovery. But in , for the captors of the last Fiordland kakapo, all this was yet to come. Somehow, almost prophetically, they named that bird Richard Henry.

  The kakapo and also called owl parrot, Maori: kakapo, night parrot, Strigops habroptilus, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand. At length kakapo reaches 60 cm, has a very soft feathers (see the 8th photo), greenish-yellow in the abdomen and moss-green with black stripes on the . Sep 9, - Explore daisyjoe82's board "Kakapo" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Kakapo parrot, Flightless parrot and Parrot pins. Last Chance to See is a BBC radio documentary series and its accompanying book, written and presented by Douglas Adams and Mark the series, Adams and Carwardine travel to various locations in the hope of encountering species on the brink of book was published in Author: Douglas Adams and Mark Carwardine. The kakapo (Māori: kākāpō or night parrot), Strigops habroptilus (Gray, ), also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand.. It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and .